Design Your Own Knife – Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife

Design Your Own Knife

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CURRENT WAIT TIME ON CUSTOM ORDERS 2-3 WEEKS (WILL UPDATE THIS DEPENDING ON CURRENT ORDERS).

An ultra-hard Japanese-style VG-10 steel core. Boasting a 60-62 Rockwell hardness.

These knives are razor sharp, and will hold an incredible edge. Treat it right, and it'll be the last knife you'll ever need.

If you're not happy with the options available, write what you'd like in the checkout description, and I'll do my best! 

Woods Choices

Woods

The handle is always the centrepiece of a knife, it's what grabs the eye, and it should be unique to you. So we like to offer choices - many choices.

Our list of woods is continually expanding, so please check back for the latest options. But they are all Australian-sourced, and I like to show off some of our most beautiful woods. 

All our softer timbers have been resin-stabilized. 

Please note that every piece of wood is unique.

Olive

Olive wood is a type of wood that only gets better with age, and this one is close to 100 years old. And the wood just gets more beautiful.

 

Crepe Myrtle Burl

The Crepe Myrtle I've sourced comes from the gorgeous area of Tasmania, and is a simply stunning timber.

 Blackheart Sassafras

This is one of the names I just love. I can't go past saying it: Blackheart Sassafras. But it's a timber that at its core is just beautiful. The heart of the timber is a deeper colour, and the lines that define it are gorgeous.

Red Mallee Burl

I was actually recommended Red Mallee Burl by a customer, and I haven't looked back since. It's a simply stunning timber - hard and very durable.

Silky Oak

This timber was sourced very locally. I made friends with a local tree services place (All Type Tree Services), and they'd just taken down an old Silky Oak tree. I rushed in and sourced some of this fantastic timber. It has a kind of holographic effect when you spin it around. It's just gorgeous.

Light Gum Burl

I wish I could tell you what sort of gum it was, but I really can't. All I can say is that it's fantastic. So much character and figure to it. And just brilliant. 

Rose Gum Burl

Sourced from Rural SA, this Rose Gum Burl is a beautiful timber, full of character which will look incredible.

Mulga Timber

This is a desert timber, found in some of the driest arid regions of Australia. Because of that, it's a very hard timber to source, but looks brilliant - it just pops with figure and character.

Grape Vine

This is one of my favourites. I found a really old, hollowed-out chunk of grape vine, but after a stabilisation treatment, it really showed the natural beauty of a timber that's rarely seen. The hollowing allows me to put the wood against any colour, which looks exceptional.

Stringybark Burl

Stringybark is an Australian timber, and one guess on how they decided to name it. But it works. And looks incredible.

 

Froot Loops 

This one you just look at and go yes, I want it. But I couldn't recommend eating them. The Froot Loops have gone through a stabilisation treatment, then into a pressure pot with the clear resin to push any remaining bubbles from the cereal. And I can promise one thing: nobody else will have this.

Hickory

An American timber, loved by wood smokers, it's a beautiful grain and colour, and will look great against any colour.

Iron Bark

A classic Australian timber, this orange wood is beautiful, and will look great against many of the colours.

 Bubinga

I just like the name of this one. The tree originates from South Africa, but this timber is grown and sourced in Australia. It's a very hard timber - one of our hardest - but beautiful. The timber almost has a holographic effect when looked at from different angles.

Ringed Gidgee

This South Australian timber takes the crown as our hardest. It's insanely hard, and beautiful, with so much character.

Termite Eaten Macadamia Timber

I was having some fun with this one - it's from a Macadamia tree that was hollowed out by termites, but I put the timber through a stabilisation process to give it exceptional strength. The natural tunnels, once filled with epoxy, really make it pop.

 

Zebrawood

This timber has some of the biggest grain definition of any woods I've played with so far. A simply stunning timber.

 

Conkerberry

This one is a very limited supply, and one of the oddest timbers I've ever found. It's one of the most orange timbers I've laid eyes on, and beautiful. Simply stunning. 

 Colours/Epoxy Highlights.

Epoxy Resin

For those that don't know, Epoxy Resin is a two-part resin, which when mixed together produces a clear, rock-hard substance. When I add pearl pigments to it after combining the two parts, it creates literally any colour of the rainbow.

The Epoxy Resin mixed with any of the wood choices makes the timber pop. It makes the natural beauty of the wood stand out and really grab the eye. But Epoxy Resin is also brilliant as a standalone option. 

The colour options are only limited by your imagination.

Lightning Purple

Yellow, Blue, Green & Purple Set

Black with Gold Swirl

I could go on for a while, but many options are available, and I can do any mix with whatever woods you like. 

 

Blade Types

Blades

Paring Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 88mm (3.5").

A useful knife for turning fruit and veg, and other small, delicate tasks.

Bird's Beak Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 105mm (4").

A great little knife, useful for top-and-tailing onions, and perfect for making curved cuts. One of my go-to little knives.

Utility Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 125mm (5").

A fantastic blade for smaller, more delicate jobs.

Boning Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 165mm (6.5").

This blade is perfect for getting into joints of meat, and very useful for going around the curves.

Chef's Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 200mm (8").

This is a go-to in the kitchen. This is the all-purpose knife that everybody needs. 

K-Tip Chef's Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 200mm (8").

Similar to the Chef's Knife, the profile on this blade is a little different - it's a mixture between a Santoku and Chef's Knife, with a tip that's harder to stab yourself with.

Santoku Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 190mm (7.5").

This is a great chopper, useful for up-and-down chopping motions. One of my first picks when I'm hunting for a knife.

Nakiri Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 190mm (7.5").

Similar to a meat cleaver, but with a thinner blade designed for fruits and vegetables, this is a great knife, and a favourite of many.

Carving/Slicer/Brisket Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 200mm (8").

This type of blade is great for carving a roast, and getting a long, straight cut in one pull. If you're carving a fantastic roast, the knife should be a pretty one!

Bread Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 250mm (10").

Great for slicing, well, bread. The serrated edges go through it with ease, and it's very sharp.

Steel Information

Steel - VG10

With the steel, I like to keep things simple. I don't want people to have to think about it, or worry about it. I've done the research and testing so that you don't need to. 

Picking a knife steel is a series of trade-offs, and the more you look into it, the more confusing it gets. But I like to keep it simple. Our knives only use VG10 steel cores. It's a stainless steel, with the properties of a high-carbon steel.

It features a 60-62 Rockwell Rating (similar to a Shun), which means the blade is harder, and will hold a much better edge than the traditional Globals or Wusthofs. It's potentially more brittle, but will stand up to everything except hacking at bones in the kitchen.

I'd advise against putting these knives in a dishwasher. No good knife should ever go in a dishwasher.

For sharpening, first thing I'd recommend is learning how to hone a knife. A few swipes down a steel before use, and your knife will potentially stay sharp for years of home use. I'm a chef, and I can keep these knives razor sharp in a commercial kitchen for 5 months without using more than a steel. After that, use traditional whetstones, or awesome paper wheels on a grinder.

Contact me if you'd like any more information or ideas.