Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife - Your Last Knife
Design Your Own Knife
Design Your Own Knife

Design Your Own Knife

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Approximately 2 week production time on custom knives. I've finally gotten through my backlog. 

An ultra-hard Japanese-style VG-10 steel core. Boasting a 60-62 Rockwell hardness.

These knives are razor sharp, and will hold an incredible edge. Treat it right, and it'll be the last knife you'll ever need.

If you're not happy with the options available, write what you'd like in the checkout description, and I'll do my best! 

Woods Choices

Timber

 

Every piece of wood is unique. I hunt for the most gnarly, knotty and interesting pieces I can find; and given that, I have no idea what the handle will look like until I've sanded and shaped the handle.

All the softer timbers have been vacuum resin stabilised, to create a harder, stronger handle.

Almond Timber

I've got a mate (All Purpose Tree Services), who when he needs to take down a tree, he lets me know. I got a phone call to say he had some almond and did I want it. Damn right I wanted it. 

It's an incredible dense wood, and beautiful!

Red Gum Burl

The second I saw this timber, it was an instant favourite. It has masses of voids and character, and when matched against a colour, it's just incredible.

Olive

Olive wood is a type of wood that only gets better with age, and this one is close to 100 years old. And the wood just gets more beautiful.

 

Crepe Myrtle Burl

The Crepe Myrtle I've sourced comes from the gorgeous area of Tasmania, and is a simply stunning timber.

 Blackheart Sassafras

This is one of the names I just love. I can't go past saying it: Blackheart Sassafras. But it's a timber that at its core is just beautiful. The heart of the timber is a deeper colour, and the lines that define it are gorgeous.

Red Mallee Burl

I was actually recommended Red Mallee Burl by a customer, and I haven't looked back since. It's a simply stunning timber - hard and very durable.

Silky Oak

This timber was sourced very locally. I made friends with a local tree services place (All Type Tree Services), and they'd just taken down an old Silky Oak tree. I rushed in and sourced some of this fantastic timber. It has a kind of holographic effect when you spin it around. It's just gorgeous.


Light Gum Burl

I wish I could tell you what sort of gum it was, but I really can't. All I can say is that it's fantastic. So much character and figure to it. And just brilliant. 

Bimble Burl

This one was a surprise to me. I ordered in some timber from one of my suppliers, and this burl snuck into the order. I cut it open, and discovered it was something really cool!

Bloodwood Burl

This is a very interesting timber. It's beautiful, with lots of deep lines through the timber. 

Rose Gum Burl

Sourced from Rural SA, this Rose Gum Burl is a beautiful timber, full of character which will look incredible.

Mulga Timber

This is a desert timber, found in some of the driest arid regions of Australia. Because of that, it's a very hard timber to source, but looks brilliant - it just pops with figure and character.



Stringybark Burl

Stringybark is an Australian timber, and one guess on how they decided to name it. But it works. And looks incredible.

 


Hickory

An American timber, loved by wood smokers, it's a beautiful grain and colour, and will look great against any colour.

Iron Bark

A classic Australian timber, this orange wood is beautiful, and will look great against many of the colours.

 Bubinga

I just like the name of this one. The tree originates from South Africa, but this timber is grown and sourced in Australia. It's a very hard timber - one of our hardest - but beautiful. The timber almost has a holographic effect when looked at from different angles.

Ringed Gidgee

This South Australian timber takes the crown as our hardest. It's insanely hard, and beautiful, with so much character.

Termite Eaten Macadamia Timber

I was having some fun with this one - it's from a Macadamia tree that was hollowed out by termites, but I put the timber through a stabilisation process to give it exceptional strength. The natural tunnels, once filled with epoxy, really make it pop.

 

Zebrawood

This timber has some of the biggest grain definition of any woods I've played with so far. A simply stunning timber.

 Colours/Epoxy Highlights.

Colour/Epoxy Resin

For those that don't know, Epoxy Resin is a two-part resin, which when mixed together produces a clear, rock-hard substance. When I add pearl pigments to it after combining the two parts, it creates literally any colour of the rainbow.

This gives me the option to add any colours together, and highlight both the incredible beauty of the timbers, or the incredibly vibrant colours you want to see.

I can do knives with just solid colour:

Black with Gold Swirl

 

Or when mixing them with a timber, each colour gives a completely new feel to the knife.

This is Stringybark Burl, and it should give us an idea of the different colour options.

 

 As you can see, each colour brings out something different with the same timber, each creation is unique and brilliant.

Blade Types

Blades

Paring Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 88mm (3.5").

A useful knife for turning fruit and veg, and other small, delicate tasks.

Bird's Beak Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 105mm (4").

A great little knife, useful for top-and-tailing onions, and perfect for making curved cuts. One of my go-to little knives.

Utility Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 125mm (5").

A fantastic blade for smaller, more delicate jobs.

Boning Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 165mm (6.5").

This blade is perfect for getting into joints of meat, and very useful for going around the curves.

15cm Chef's Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 150mm (6").

Sometimes the bigger 20cm chef's knife is just a little too big, and this knife comes into it's own, it's a great little knife for when you just want to slice some cherry tomatoes.

20cm Chef's Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 200mm (8").

This is a go-to in the kitchen. This is the all-purpose knife that everybody needs. 

K-Tip Chef's Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 200mm (8").

Similar to the Chef's Knife, the profile on this blade is a little different - it's a mixture between a Santoku and Chef's Knife, with a tip that's harder to stab yourself with.

24cm Chef's Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 240mm (9.5").

This blade is great for those big jobs, want to cut down a whole carrot length in one go, this'll do it. Need to cut a mass of vegies in one go, here's your new go to knife. It's excellent, and will get pulled out first!

Santoku Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 190mm (7.5").

This is a great chopper, useful for up-and-down chopping motions. One of my first picks when I'm hunting for a knife.

Nakiri Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 190mm (7.5").

Similar to a meat cleaver, but with a thinner blade designed for fruits and vegetables, this is a great knife, and a favourite of many.

Bread Knife

The blade, not including the handle, is 250mm (10").

Great for slicing, well, bread. The serrated edges go through it with ease, and it's very sharp.

Brisket Knife

This is one of my favourite knives. Its long and flat edge is perfect for cutting through a brilliant bit of meat in one clean stroke. 

The blade is 260mm (10.5"), and is just brilliant.

High Carbon Sharpening Steel

One of the questions I get a lot is, which one should I get, the high carbon sharpening steel, or the diamond steel.

The best way to keep a knife sharp is to use the high carbon steel before each use. Doing this will keep it stupid sharp for a very long time. If you do that, then the high carbon steel is my suggestion.

 

Diamond Sharpening Steel

This steel is a little different than the high carbon steel. Mostly because it has a layer of very fine grit of diamond through it (600 grit). So when you use this steel, it'll grind off a very fine layer of steel at the same time. 

If you're likely only to use the steel when the knife starts to feel dull, grab the diamond steel. 

 

 

Images under knife Handles

Images on knife handles.

I developed a method to place images under the handle finish on the knives. It works best with images with transparent backgrounds. Message me if you're unsure and would like some more information.

Steel Information

Steel can be confusing for people not in the industry. So I plan to dumb it down a little.

However, for those in the know, the core steel is VG10, with an outer damascus cladding. The core is a stainless steel with a high carbon content containing 1% Carbon, 15% Chromium, 1% Molybdenum, 0.2% Vanadium, 1.5% Cobalt, and 0.5% Manganese.

There is no perfect knife steel.

Knife makers will argue to the end of the earth about which one is better, so as a chef who's been using knives for the last 16 years, I've picked my favourite, and it's what I use in all my knives.

 

What do I like about the steel?

First thing to introduce people to is the Rockwell Hardness rating. It's basically a test that pushes a pin into a piece of steel, and the harder it needs to push to make an indent, the harder the steel is.

Our Rockwell rating is 60-62. 

Comparing to some well known brands:

Global: 56-58

Wusthof: 58

Victorinox: 56

Henkles: 55

 

Mine are on par with a brand like Shun. If you've used them before, expect the same.

 

So what does that actually mean?

I hate blunt knives, and the harder the steel, the longer the knife will stay sharper. I still find the steel easy enough to sharpen, and it has very good rust resistance.

 

Maintenance & Care

No dishwashers.

Just no. 

The high heat & steam inside of the dishwasher will make the wood expand, and it can come off the epoxy. The finish over the handles will yellow and crack, and the caustic cleaning agents can cause pitting inside the steel, which will help rust. 

Just detergent and handwash. 

 

Keeping them sharp.

My knifes aren't the mythical infomercials that claim to cut through a boot, and then through a tomato (those are just serrated knives, and they saw the food, not cut it, and are just horrible to use). 

First thing is to learn the difference between between honing and edge and sharpening it. 

Honing

Honing isn't sharpening the knife. If you look at the edge under a microscope, after use, the extremely fine bevel will bend or roll from one side to the other. Then you aren't cutting with the cutting edge, but pushing the rolled edge through the food, and the blade feels blunt. 

Honing is basically pushing that rolled edge straight again. 

This is a sharpening steel:

If you give the knife two or three swipes on each side before use, it'll stay sharp a really long time. The steel is really hard, so it won't wear down quickly, and this is all most people will need too do.

But eventually:

 

Sharpening

If you're in Adelaide, bring it back to me and I'll sharpen them for free. If you're a bit far for that, I'll go through my basics.

There is a good chance that there are professionals in your area who can sharpen them well, I'd suggest them (usually $5-$10 per blade, if you keep the edge honed, with home use, it could be a year between needing it).

If you want to do it yourself, I like whet stones. 1000/6000 combo ones are what I'd recommend. And watch a few youtube videos on how it's done. 

 

If you're handy, and have a bench grinder, grab a paper wheel and some buffing compound.  

Contact me if you'd like any more information or ideas.